Hurricane Maria Response

Hurricane Maria Response Edison, NJ - Region II

 

Site Contact:

Elias Rodriguez
Public Information Officer

rodriguez.elias@epa.gov

Hurricane Maria Response Edison, NJ 08854
response.epa.gov/hurricane-maria



Check out our Hurricane Maria Story Map here.

EPA Hurricane Maria Update – Spring 2018

EPA continues to support the Federal Emergency Management Agency's assistance to the governments of Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI) in the aftermath of hurricanes Maria and Irma. EPA is focused on environmental impacts and public health threats as well as ensuring the safety of those in the affected areas. EPA’s work includes the collection of household hazardous waste and debris management, oil and chemical spill response, vessel recovery, management of medical waste and activities to restore drinking water and wastewater services.

Important Resources
Map of Ambient Air Stations in Puerto Rico
Videos About Household Hazardous Waste Collection
Flood Clean Up and the Air in Your Home Factsheet

Personnel
EPA has had a strong presence throughout the hurricane response, with over 700 EPA personnel to date who have deployed in support of Irma and Maria.

Debris Management and Hazardous Materials
Hurricanes generate vast amounts of debris and hazardous waste, and Hurricanes Irma and Maria generated enough debris to fill Yankee Stadium seven times. EPA is the lead federal agency responsible for the collection and proper disposal of oil and hazardous waste material. EPA is also working to collect and ensure the proper disposal of medical waste in the USVI.

Household hazardous waste can contaminate the land, waterways, and groundwater if improperly disposed of. Household hazardous waste includes batteries, aerosol cans, household cleaners and chemicals, paint, and electronic waste like computers and televisions. Batteries are a major concern due to the large volume of batteries being used by residents who are without power.

In Puerto Rico and the USVI, more than 550,000 items of household hazardous waste, white goods and electronic waste have been collected to date. EPA is actively working with its federal partners, and the Puerto Rico and USVI governments on this effort in order to protect public health and the environment.

Marine Operations
EPA supports the U.S. Coast Guard in the recovery of submerged or damaged vessels. EPA is part of multi-agency field teams that are locating and evaluating the condition of sunken vessels and removing hazardous materials. To date, EPA and the U.S. Coast Guard have assessed close to 400 vessels in Puerto Rico and close to 500 in the USVI. Marine Operations are closed in the USVI.

Assessment of Superfund Sites, Oil Sites and Regulated Facilities
EPA has completed assessments at over 300 regulated facilities, EPA-led Superfund sites, oil sites, and chemical facilities in both Puerto Rico and the USVI to determine if the sites were affected by Hurricane Maria. All hurricane-related response actions at these sites have been completed. EPA did not identify any major spills or releases from these facilities associated with Hurricane Maria.

Drinking Water and Wastewater Management
EPA continues to support federal, territorial and local government efforts to ensure clean water for residents though sampling, analysis and technical support across Puerto Rico and the USVI. The Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority (PRASA) and the Puerto Rico Department of Health continue to monitor drinking water quality to ensure that PRASA and non-PRASA drinking water supplies meet local and federal drinking water standards. EPA completed evaluations of drinking water systems not managed by PRASA, or “non-PRASA” systems, and continues to support efforts to return Puerto Rico’s drinking water systems to pre-storm conditions.

EPA collected more than 2,500 samples of drinking water in both Puerto Rico and the USVI from water systems to help the governments and water systems providers make decisions on how to best address any water quality problems found. Additionally, 266 waste water treatment plants were assessed.

April Visit

As the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s response work is beginning to wrap up, the agency is transitioning into long-term recovery work. EPA Regional Administrator Pete Lopez traveled to Puerto Rico to aid in this transition through furtherance of the strong relationships that EPA has built with local, Puerto Rico and federal agencies. As part of his trip, Mr. Lopez met with Tania Vazquez, Secretary of the Puerto Rico Department of Natural and Environmental Resources (DNER) and President of the Puerto Rico Environmental Quality Board (EQB), Puerto Rico Department of Health Secretary Dr. Rafael Rodriguez Mercado, Mayor of the Municipality of Carolina Jose Aponte Dalmau, Proyecto ENLACE Caño Martin Peña Director Lyvia Rodriguez, and local officials, community representatives and federal government officials across the island to discuss continued support and coordination as Puerto Rico embarks on the road to full recovery from Hurricanes Irma and Maria. EPA’s focus is helping to bring additional resources and support on-the-ground so that Puerto Rico’s governmental and grassroots leaders can prioritize and meet local needs.

With limited recycling options and approximately 29 unlined landfills and open dumps throughout the island, solid waste management has been a challenge for Puerto Rico that predates the 2017 hurricanes. The storms generated approximately 3.85 million cubic yards, according to the US Army Corp of Engineers (USACE). There was also an increase in illegal dumping after the hurricanes. The EPA, in coordination with FEMA and USACE, has assessed over 150 illegal dumps that appeared after the hurricane and has collected household hazardous waste and e-waste from across the island. In addition, EPA is beginning work with the Puerto Rico government and local municipalities to help them assess landfill capacity as a first step towards making improvements to programs to handle solid waste. On April 24, the Regional Administrator visited Carolina Municipal Landfill, which is a lined landfill and has an extensive recycling program. EPA will work closely with the Puerto Rico government and local municipalities to find ways in which EPA can support efforts to build a better solid waste program for communities across Puerto Rico.

On April 25, the Regional Administrator went to Caguas to visit the Buenos Aires community water system to view the solar panels installed by Water Mission. Buenos Aires is one of approximately 237 water systems in Puerto Rico not operated by the Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority (PRASA). These systems serve approximately three percent of the island, or approximately 100,000 customers. Because these water systems are in remote locations, it has been difficult to provide generators or hard line electrical power during the response. Under a mission assignment from FEMA, and in close cooperation with the Puerto Rico government, EPA is working to support these non-Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority systems. Helping these drinking water systems to be more sustainable through future support and aid will enhance public health protections.

On April 26, the Regional Administrator toured the PRASA-run Puerto Nuevo Wastewater Treatment Plant with PRASA President Eli Diaz. As part of its recovery work EPA will continue to assess community drinking water needs and will work with federal partners to identify sources of funding or other help that can be brought to these communities. Regional Administrator Lopez underscored the importance improving PRASA’s critical wastewater services including the goal of strengthening the resiliency of these systems to withstand future storm events.
During the week, Regional Administrator Lopez also met with Brenda Torres of the San Juan Bay Estuary program to discuss challenges in detecting illegal discharges into the estuary and partnering with PRASA, San Juan and the Commonwealth to reduce discharges into the bay. He met with Department of Natural and Environmental Resources Secretary and Environmental Quality Board President Tania Vázquez Rivera at the Puerto Rico EQB Analytical Laboratory in San Juan to review progress on the recovery there and got an update on efforts to repair, re-energize and reboot the government’s air monitoring network.

At the Carolina Municipal Landfill, discussions centered on the need to improve recycling and the island’s management of solid waste. Talks with the Puerto Rico Department of Health highlighted the importance of strengthening non-Puerto Rico Aqueduct and Sewer Authority systems to help them secure quality drinking water. While visiting the community served by ENLACE, Regional Administrator Lopez covered topics that included environment quality and public health for all of Puerto Rico’s people. Dredging of the Cano Martin Pena and restoring sanitary sewers is a priority in the area.

On April 23, EPA Regional Administrator Pete Lopez met with Governor Kenneth Mapp, Interim Executive Director for the USVI Waste Management Authority Tawana Albany Nicholas, and other local and federal government officials in St. Thomas, USVI to discuss continued support and coordination on environmental protection. EPA is coordinating recovery needs with FEMA and other federal agencies with a goal of addressing long-standing challenges and environmental concerns. The EPA is participating in recovery assessments, along with territory and local government partners, to provide a springboard upon which joint strategies will be built for the USVI. Access to clean drinking water and supporting wastewater infrastructure will remain a top priority, along with work to address solid waste issues exacerbated by the hurricanes.

To report suspected spills, contamination or possible violations:
• To report oil, chemical, or hazardous substance releases or spills, call the National Response Center 1-800-424-8802 (24 hours a day every day). For those without 800 access, please call 202-267-2675.

For general questions about EPA’s response in Region 2, please call 1-888-283-7626 during regular business hours.

For Spanish speakers, please call our Caribbean Environmental Protection Division at 787-977-5865.

Actualización de la EPA sobre el Huracán María – Primavera de 2018

La EPA continúa apoyando la asistencia de FEMA (la Agencia Federal para el Manejo de Emergencias) a los gobiernos de Puerto Rico y de las Islas Vírgenes Estadounidenses (USVI) tras la devastación provocada por los huracanes María e Irma. La EPA se enfoca en los impactos ambientales y las amenazas a la salud pública así como en garantizar la seguridad de quienes se encuentran en las áreas afectadas. El trabajo de la EPA incluye la recolección de desechos domésticos peligrosos y el manejo de escombros, la respuesta ante derrames de petróleo y sustancias químicas, la recuperación de embarcaciones, el control de desechos médicos y las actividades para restaurar los servicios de agua potable y aguas sanitarias.

Recursos importantes
Mapa de estaciones del aire ambiental en Puerto Rico
Videos acerca de los centros de acopio de desechos domésticos peligrosos
Hoja informativa sobre limpieza tras inundaciones y el aire en su hogar

Personal
La EPA ha tenido una presencia destacada a lo largo de la respuesta, con más de 700 empleados de la EPA a la fecha que han sido asignados en apoyo a la labor desplegada tras los huracanes Irma y Maria.

Manejo de escombros y materiales peligrosos
Los huracanes generan grandes cantidades de escombros y desechos peligrosos, y los Huracanes Irma y María generaron suficientes escombros como para llenar siete veces el Estadio de los Yankees. La EPA es la principal agencia federal responsable de recoger y eliminar debidamente materiales de desechos peligrosos y petróleo. La EPA también está trabajando para recoger y asegurar la eliminación correcta de desechos médicos en las USVI.

Los desechos domésticos peligrosos pueden contaminar la tierra, los cuerpos de agua y el agua subterránea si no se eliminan de manera correcta. Los desechos domésticos peligrosos incluyen baterías (pilas), latas de aerosol, productos de limpieza para el hogar y sustancias químicas, pintura y desechos electrónicos como computadoras y televisores. Las baterías o pilas son una importante preocupación debido al gran volumen de baterías que utilizan los residentes que no tienen servicio de electricidad.

En Puerto Rico y las USVI, se han recogido a la fecha casi 550,000 artículos de desechos domésticos peligrosos, electrodomésticos y desechos electrónicos. La EPA está trabajando activamente con sus socios federales, y con los gobiernos de Puerto Rico y de las USVI en su esfuerzo destinado a proteger la salud pública y el medioambiente.

Operaciones marítimas
La EPA apoya a los Guardacostas de los EE. UU. en la recuperación de embarcaciones hundidas o dañadas. La EPA forma parte de equipos de campo con integrantes de múltiples agencias, los cuales están dedicados a localizar y evaluar las condiciones de las naves hundidas y eliminar materiales peligrosos. A la fecha, la EPA y los Guardacostas de los EE. UU. han evaluado cerca de 400 embarcaciones en Puerto Rico y cerca de 500 en las USVI. En las USVI han concluido las operaciones marítimas.

Evaluación de sitios Superfund, sitios de petróleo e instalaciones reguladas
La EPA ha llevado a cabo evaluaciones en más de 300 instalaciones reguladas, sitios Superfund dirigidos por la EPA, sitios de petróleo e instalaciones químicas tanto en Puerto Rico como en las USVI a fin de determinar si los sitios se vieron afectados por el Huracán María. Han finalizado todas las medidas de respuesta relacionadas con huracanes en estos sitios. La EPA no identificó ningún derrame o emanaciones importantes desde estas instalaciones en relación con el Huracán María.

Agua de beber y manejo de aguas sanitarias
La EPA continúa apoyando la labor de las entidades federales, territoriales y locales para asegurar el agua limpia para los residentes a través de muestreos, análisis y apoyo técnico en todo Puerto Rico y las USVI. La Autoridad de Acueductos y Alcantarillados (AAA) de Puerto Rico y el Departamento de Salud de Puerto Rico continúan monitoreando la calidad del agua potable para asegurar que los suministros de agua potable dentro y fuera de la red de la AAA cumplan con las normas locales y federales para el agua potable. La EPA completó evaluaciones de los sistemas de agua potable que no maneja la AAA, también llamados sistemas “que no son de la AAA”, y continúa apoyando la labor de restablecer los sistemas de agua potable en Puerto Rico a las condiciones existentes antes de las tormentas.

La EPA recogió más de 2,500 muestras de agua potable tanto en Puerto Rico como en las USVI de los sistemas de agua para ayudar a los gobiernos y a los proveedores de sistemas de agua a tomar decisiones sobre cómo abordar óptimamente cualquier problema de calidad del agua que se encuentre. Además, se evaluaron 266 plantas de tratamiento de aguas sanitarias.

Vista en abril

La EPA continúa apoyando la asistencia de la Agencia Federal para el Manejo de Emergencias a los gobiernos de Puerto Rico y de las Islas Vírgenes Estadounidenses (USVI) tras la devastación provocada por los huracanes María e Irma. La EPA se enfoca en los impactos ambientales y las amenazas a la salud pública así como en garantizar la seguridad de quienes se encuentran en las áreas afectadas. El trabajo de la EPA incluye la recolección de desechos domésticos peligrosos y el manejo de escombros, respuesta ante derrames de petróleo y sustancias químicas, recuperación de embarcaciones, control de desechos médicos y actividades para restaurar los servicios de agua potable y aguas sanitarias.

Ahora que la labor de respuesta de la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de los EE. UU. está llegando a su fin, la agencia se encuentra en transición hacia el trabajo de recuperación a largo plazo. Pete López, Administrador Regional de la EPA, viajó a Puerto Rico para ayudar en esta transición promoviendo las sólidas relaciones que ha forjado la EPA con las entidades locales, de Puerto Rico y las federales. Como parte de este viaje, el Sr. López se reunió con Tania Vázquez, Secretaria del Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales (DRNA) de Puerto Rico y Presidenta de la Junta de Calidad Ambiental (JCA) de Puerto Rico, con Dr. Rafael Rodríguez Mercado, Secretario de Departamento de Salud de Puerto Rico, con José Aponte Dalmau, Alcalde del Municipio de Carolina, con Lyvia Rodríguez, Directora del Proyecto ENLACE Caño Martín Peña y con funcionarios locales, representantes comunitarios y funcionarios del gobierno federal en toda la isla para debatir el apoyo y la coordinación continuos a medida que Puerto Rico emprende el camino hacia la plena recuperación tras los huracanes Irma y María. El enfoque de la EPA está ayudando a aportar recursos adicionales y apoyo en terreno de tal modo que los líderes gubernamentales y comunitarios puedan priorizar y satisfacer las necesidades locales.

Teniendo opciones limitadas de reciclaje y aproximadamente 29 rellenos sanitarios sin revestimiento y vertederos expuestos en toda la isla, se ha dificultado la administración de desechos sólidos para Puerto Rico desde antes de los huracanes de 2017. Las tormentas generaron aproximadamente 3.85 millones de yardas cúbicas de desechos, según el Cuerpo de Ingenieros del Ejército de los EE. UU. (USACE). También hubo un aumento en vertederos ilegales tras los huracanes. La EPA, en coordinación con FEMA y el USACE, ha evaluado más de 150 vertederos ilegales que aparecieron tras el huracán, recolectando desechos domésticos peligrosos y desechos electrónicos en toda la isla. Además, la EPA está comenzando a trabajar con el gobierno de Puerto Rico y los municipios locales para ayudarles a evaluar la capacidad de vertederos como primer paso hacia hacer mejoras a los programas para controlar los desechos sólidos. El 24 de abril, el Administrador Regional visitó el Relleno Sanitario Municipal de Carolina, que es un relleno sanitario con revestimiento y posee un amplio programa de reciclaje. La EPA colaborará estrechamente con el gobierno de Puerto Rico y con los municipios locales para hallar maneras en que la EPA puede apoyar la labor de crear un mejor programa de desechos sólidos para las comunidades en todo Puerto Rico.

El 25 de abril, el Administrador Regional fue a Caguas para visitar el sistema comunitario de agua de Buenos Aires para ver los paneles solares instalados por Water Mission. Buenos Aires es uno de aproximadamente 237 sistemas de agua en Puerto Rico no operados por la Autoridad de Acueductos y Alcantarillados (AAA) de Puerto Rico. Estos sistemas sirven aproximadamente al tres por ciento de la isla, o aproximadamente a 100,000 clientes. Dado que estos sistemas de agua se encuentran en lugares remotos, ha sido difícil proporcionar generadores o energía eléctrica alámbrica durante la respuesta. Conforme a una misión asignada de FEMA, y en estrecha cooperación con el gobierno de Puerto Rico, la EPA está trabajando para apoyar a estos sistemas que se hallan fuera de la red de la Autoridad e Acueductos y Alcantarillados de Puerto Rico. El hecho de colaborar para que estos sistemas de agua potable sean más sostenibles mediante apoyo y ayuda a futuro contribuirá a proteger la salud pública.

El 26 de abril, el Administrador Regional recorrió con el Presidente de la AAA, Eli Díaz, la Planta de Tratamiento de Aguas Sanitarias de Puerto Nuevo que administra la AAA Como parte de su labor de recuperación, la EPA continuará evaluando las necesidades de agua potable de la comunidad y trabajará con socios federales para identificar fuentes de financiamiento u otra ayuda que se pueda aportar a estas comunidades. El Administrador Regional López destacó la importancia de mejorar los servicios de aguas sanitarias de AAA, incluyendo el objetivo de reforzar la resistencia de estos sistemas para que soporten tormentas futuras.

Durante la semana, el Administrador Regional López se reunió también con Brenda Torres del programa del Estuario de la Bahía de San Juan a fin de abordar las dificultades para detectar descargas ilegales al estuario y asociarse con AAA, San Juan y el Gobierno del Estado Libre Asociado para reducir las descargas dentro de la bahía. Se reunió con Tania Vázquez Rivera, Secretaria del Departamento de Recursos Naturales y Ambientales (DRNA) de Puerto Rico y Presidenta de la Junta de Calidad Ambiental (JCA) de Puerto Rico en el Laboratorio Analítico de la JCA en San Juan para evaluar el progreso en la recuperación allí y se enteró de las novedades sobre la labor de reparar, revigorizar y reiniciar la red de monitoreo del aire del gobierno.

En el Relleno Sanitario Municipal de Carolina, los debates se concentraron en la necesidad de mejorar el reciclaje y en la administración de desechos sólidos en la isla. Las conversaciones con el Departamento de Salud de Puerto Rico destacaron la importancia de reforzar los sistemas que están fuera de la red de la Autoridad de Acueductos y Alcantarillados de Puerto Rico para ayudar a asegurar agua potable de calidad. Cuando visitó la comunidad servida por ENLACE, el Administrador Regional López abordó temas que incluyeron la calidad del ambiente y la salud pública para toda la gente de Puerto Rico. Es una prioridad en el área el dragado del Caño Martín Peña y la restauración de alcantarillados sanitarios.

El 23 de abril, Pete López, Administrador Regional de la EPA se reunió con el Gobernador Kenneth Mapp, con Tawana Albany Nicholas, Directora Ejecutiva Interina de la Autoridad de Administración de Desechos de las USVI, y con otros funcionarios locales y federales en St. Thomas, USVI, para conversar sobre el apoyo y la coordinación continuos en cuanto a la protección ambiental. La EPA se encuentra coordinando activamente las necesidades de recuperación con FEMA y otras agencias federales con el objetivo de abordar dificultades e inquietudes ambientales existentes de larga data. La EPA está participando en evaluaciones de recuperación, junto con socios de gobiernos territoriales y locales, para dar un impulso de partida desde donde surjan estrategias conjuntas para las USVI. El acceso a agua potable limpia y la infraestructura de aguas sanitarias de apoyo seguirán siendo una prioridad fundamental, junto con la labor para abordar problemas de desechos sólidos que se vieron exacerbados por los huracanes.

Para reportar sospechas de derrames, contaminación o posibles infracciones:
• Para reportar derrames o liberación de petróleo/aceite, sustancias químicas o peligrosas, llame al Centro Nacional de Respuesta al 1-800-424-8802 (las 24 horas del día). Si no tiene acceso a números con 800, por favor llame al 202-267-2675.

Para preguntas generales acerca de la respuesta de la EPA en la Región 2, sírvase llamar al 1-888-283-7626 durante horarios normales de atención.

A los usuarios que hablen español, se les ruega llamar a nuestra División de Protección Ambiental del Caribe al 787-977-5865.